Broadband speeds streets of shame

Railway Hill near Canterbury has been revealed as the street with the slowest broadband speeds in the country. Downloading a film off the internet would take 48 hours

Railway Hill near Canterbury has been revealed as the street with the slowest broadband speeds in the country.

Average speeds of just 0.13Mb on the road, which is just three miles from Canterbury, mean that downloading a film from the internet would take around 48 hours.

"They'd be far better off walking to Canterbury and back and renting a DVD off the shelf," said researchers.

The situation wasn't much better at Tewkesbury Road in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, where the average download speed stands at just 0.14Mb.

"The tide could come in four times before you've managed to download your favourite film," said Top10.com, which carried out the research.

More than two million broadband speed tests showed that these "super-slow" speeds compare to a national average of 6.21Mb - nearly 50 times faster than Railway Hill.

Michael Phillips, Broadbandchoices.co.uk product director, said: "As many parts of the country speed ahead with superfast broadband of up to 40Mb, 50Mb and even 100Mb connections, some areas are suffering with little more than dial-up speeds.

"Providers need to work as hard as possible to make sure that these areas are brought up-to-speed, especially since neither area is particularly rural," he added.

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