1 in 4 Brits admit drunk online shopping

Internet shopping and alcohol don't mix, as research shows 40% of Brits regret drunken online purchases.

A quarter of Britain's web users have drunkenly done a spot of online shopping, according to new research by broadbandchoices.co.uk.

In a survey of 2,000 people, 28% of those questioned said they'd shopped on the internet while under the influence of alcohol. One in four confessed they had later regretted a drunken buy.

Among the most unusual items people admitted to buying online when drunk were false teeth, sex toys and a musical Chairman Mao cigarette lighter.

Dominic Baliszewski, telecoms expert at broadbandchoices, said: "Post-pub purchases are becoming more common due to rising ownership of tablets and smartphones - we're online all the time and can indulge in retail therapy whenever we like.

"However, it's not always a good idea to buy goods at all hours of the day. We've heard from people who've bought train tickets to the wrong end of the country, and a 1930s male bathing suit, and chilli vodka that was so hot it was undrinkable - all purchased while inebriated.

"As online shopping becomes ever more mobile we expect to see a continued rise of this 'net regret' from online shopping."

Ofcom, the UK's communications regulator, recently revealed British consumers spend an average of £1,083 a year online - that's more per head than every other major economy in the world, including China, Japan and the US.

The broadbandchoices study found 11% of online shoppers had spent over £200 on something they later wished they hadn't bought.

Suggested Pages

  • How to monitor your internet usage

  • Broadband contracts: The small print

  • Where can I get free broadband?

  • Why get a static IP address?

  • How to set up a home office in 5 steps

  • Broadband and moving home

  • The truth behind drunk online shopping

  • Social networking 'better than sex'

  • Older people can't live without internet

  • Digital downloads and the death of the physical format

  • Tim Berners-Lee wins engineering prize

  • Comic Relief tweet sees MP donate £14,000