‘Up to’ broadband advertising will be changed in 2017

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has announced plans to change how broadband speeds are advertised. It says the current ‘up to’ wording in broadband adverts is confusing and needs a revamp.

As it stands now, just 10% of all customers need to experience the advertised 'up to' speed in order to allow providers to advertise it as such. But logically, that means that up to 90% of people may not get those speeds at all.

The changes, due in 2017, will be a welcome change to customers, who will be less confused when their 'up to 76Mb' package is noticeably slower after installation.

The proposed change comes not long after the ASA implemented rules to make monthly charges clearer - another strong step towards helping customers get a clearer sense of the costs that come with broadband.

The ASA is yet to formally propose an alternative to the current broadband speed descriptions. Potential alternatives could encourage providers to detail the average speed of their broadband, the range of possible speeds, or the minimum speed.

James Blessing, chair of the Internet Services Providers' Association Council has commented on the proposed ASA changes, stating that "The ASA's research has not identified an effective alternative for the current approach to the 'up to' speed claims".

Ulitmately there will be a number of people in favour of change, and we're among them. That said, the ASA and Internet Service Providers need to strike a balance between fair advertising and making their products appealing - all the while keeping the customers' desires at heart.

Source: BBC

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