What are the 25 most common passwords this year?

Security group SplashData have revealed our 25 most common passwords - and they’re just as easy to guess as ever.

At the top of the list, there are mostly sequential lines of numbers - '123456' takes the crown for most popular, for the fifth year in a row - along with equally guessable words like 'password' and 'login'.

On the plus side, we're getting slightly more savvy. 'passw0rd' with a zero and '1qaz2wsx' hint that we're at least starting to include numbers and use things that aren't even words. Still, '1qaz2wsx' just involves dragging your finger down two columns of the keyboard… and it's the 15th most common choice.

Words like 'football', 'dragon', and 'princess' still abound too, and an interesting new entry at no.25 is 'starwars' - apparently episode VII of the franchise has awakened a new fanbase as well as the force.

So, with no further ado, the most common passwords are:

  • 123456
  • password
  • 12345678
  • qwerty
  • 12345
  • 123456789
  • football
  • 1234
  • 1234567
  • baseball
  • welcome
  • 1234567890
  • abc123
  • 111111
  • 1qaz2wsx
  • dragon
  • master
  • monkey
  • letmein
  • login
  • princess
  • qwertyuiop
  • solo
  • passw0rd
  • starwars

SplashData created the list by analysing the passwords revealed in data breaches from the USA and parts of Western Europe.

To make sure your password is secure, cybersecurity experts recommend avoiding this list like the plague. Choose passwords that contain lower case letters, upper case letters, numbers, and punctuation, and try to use different passwords for all your different accounts. A password manager like 1Password or LastPass can help.

Source: Telegraph

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